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, and it is a big if, the case does collapse, what will dominique strauss-kahn do next? >> there is been a sensational reaction in france today. this is a nation that was angry about the way he was paraded in the initial stages. it was not just about his reputation. it was the reputation of the nation itself that was being questioned. they were angry about headlines in the american newspapers. people are talking about a premature way justice was delivered. we have heard from deputies in parliament -- it is my sense that there has been so much said that it would be unthinkable for him to stand as the next presidential candidate for the socialist. i where his support goes, some might be candidacy. the outcome could have big implications. >> we are falling big business stories today. 17 e.u. finance ministers went, whew -- we have some time. >> greece lived through with their promise that they would pass austerity measures. the eu finance ministers will be discussing the next bailout. this tide's greece over. they are held over until september. the next big bailout will carry them through u
it's now clear big decisions will have to be made soon. >> by putting social security "on the table," the president is sort of calling the g.o.p. bluff. "okay, here is social security. i've told you medicare will be on the table. are you willing to put revenue increases on the table?" >> the white house believes a $4 trillion agreement is within reach. whether it can be reached will become much clearer this weekend. darren gersh, "nightly business report," washington. california is making progress on its rating. standard and poors today raised its outlook for the golden state from negative to stable. the reason, california was able to pass its budget on time, closing what was once a $27 billion gap. here are the stories in tonight's "n.b.r. newswheel." two encouraging reports about the job market-- payroll processing firm adp says, by its count, american businesses added 157,000 jobs in june. economists were expecting many fewer. that's encouraging for an upside surprise when the labor department reports june job numbers tomorrow. also, fewer people filed for unemployment benefits l
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes
," washington. >> tom: if richard cordray is confirmed, part of his job will be checking the books of big banks. we'll get a better idea of how they're doing in the coming days when many report quarterly earnings. by the end of this week, 40% of financial firms in the s&p 500 will have reported their numbers. as a group, the results are expected to be downright awful. erika miller reports. >> reporter: banks are the heartbeat of the economy, so their health is often used as a barometer of the recovery-- and the stock market. unfortunately for investors, bank analyst jim sinegal sees plenty of uncertainties ahead. >> in addition to macroeconomic uncertainties, with unemployment high, with g.d.p. growth slow, will the banks be able to add new loans? that's number one. number two is the regulatory uncertainty. we are still not sure where capital levels are going to fall out, and how that's going to affect profitability. >> reporter: as for profitability, diversified financials are expected to be the worst performer this earnings season-- down 94%. this is the group that includes bank of america, j
carry out india's worst militant attack since 2008? big dreams from a tiny island. one of the world's smallest countries hoping for olympic success. hello. it could be another landmark moment in the phone-hacking scandal. we should know very seen whether the media tycoon rupert murdoch has agreed to be questioned by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appearing. i don't suppose many are expecting him to say oh, go on then. >> i don't think so. for one thing, the parliamentary committees do not have the same powers as congressional committees and certainly they cannot force foreign citizens like rupert and james murdoch to appear before them. there is even a question mark over whether they can really force rebecca brooks, who of course is a british citizen to appear. if anyone buzz does of the three, it is thought that perhaps she will be the most likely. the lawyers
to more than two or three people. if you are talking to an audience, a big audience in a theater or a movie audience, but with television, if there are more than two or three people in the room, they're talking to each other, they're not listening to you. that camera lens became sitting and like talking to you. that is what i loved about it. tavis: there is some much stuff in this book, and there are several things i found fascinating and funny. fascinating, you apparently love crossword puzzles. >> absolutely addicted. i carry them around my purse. i am stuck on the one, the car driving me here, about halfway through but i did not finish. i said i will finish on the way back. tavis: how did you develop a love for the crosswords? >> i don't know, i love words. i am not into numbers that much, and there are people looked on that, but crossword puzzles. if i get a puppy and a paper trained him, all of a sudden i would open the paper and would be a cross word, no, you cannot go on that. tavis: are you pretty good a crossword puzzles? >> i am not a wizard, but i do them so much, pret
, the risk of a u.s. default is also a big worry for many older americans. they're conditioned about their monthly social security payments. now we placed several unanswered calls expecting social security checks on august 3. an additional 27 million beneficiaries expect payments later in the month. we caught up with a couple of them to see what's on their minds. >> it's a scare tactic. i mean because there's so many other things that they can stop before they stop social security checks. >> whether it is the republicans or democrats win this game, you have to remember next year is an election year again. so they're posturing themselves. and they're playing a game that is kind of tough. but again they have to get something passed sooner or later. >> susie: so far, the treasury has not provided details on how the government will decide which bills to pay if the borrowing limit is not raised. executives from the country's biggest banks met today with treasury officials in new york ahead of tuesday's deadline. they discussed how debt auctions would be handled if congress fails to raise
denies any personal involvement in this but we did see a quite a bad part of strategy until the other big company was brought in. >> yes. a p.r. crisis from the beginning for news international and news corp. matthew freud does deny any involvement in it, and i think he tries to keep away from it being married to rupert murdoch's daughter. there are big global p.r. networks. so they should have an effect. >> thank you for speaking with us on that. and naomi is with us. in the next hour or so. hour and a half, we are expecting to see the prime minister who still is facing quite a difficult political hurdle on this, because questions emerged further about his links with former news international employees. >> yes. this basically comes down to a question of judgment. that's why david david cameron is under more pressure than he's come under in the last year. the question of whether he did proper checks on the former editor of the "news of the world" before he decided to hire him, and more and more people have come to light over the past couple of weeks saying they warned david cameron of the
as legal. ceremonies were held from manhattan to nighing a ray falls. >> last-minute captures on the big day. same-sex couples sweltering in the heat. >> with the celebration comes spending. it's thought same-sex marriages will boost the country by $3 million over the next three years. a handful of states have legalized same-sex marriage and new york is the one that will draw in the crowds. a destination in its own right. -- in its own rite. >> mark mattias had his cupcakes at the ready. his customers in this predominantly gay area of manhattan are now planning their weddings. >> roughly 50% of our business is weddings and we're expecting a big boost in revenue due to same-sex couples's weddings. >> the federal government here doesn't recognize these weddings. >> if one of us should pass away, the other cannot get social security and with regard to finances and taxes, we're not just treated the same as a heterosexual coup. >> whatever the picture at the national level, new york is welcoming same-sex couples with open arms, and after years of waiting, newlyweds are ready to throw the ulti
in three weeks the president continued to press for a big deal to raise the debt ceiling and to reduce the deficit by $4 trillion. >> i am still pushing for us to achieve a big deal. but what i also said to the group is if we can't do the biggest deal possible, then let's still be ambitious. let's still try to at least get a down payme on deficit reduction. we are obviously running out of time. and so what i have said to the members of congress is that you need over the next 24 to 36 hours to give me some sense of whayour plan is to get the debt ceiling rais through whatever mechanisms they can think about and show me a plan in tes of what you are doing for deficit and debt reduction. if they show me a serious plan, i'm readyo move. even if it requires some toh decisions on my part. and i'm hopeful that over the next couple of days 'll see this long jam broken because the american people i think understandably want toee washgton do its job. >> president obama ruled out a 2.4 trillion plan prosed by house republicans. >> in my expectation is that you will probably see the house vote on
not want to use a file to investigate it. >> how big a day is this today? >> it is a big day for parliament to make sure they can answer the questions. powerand get subpoena back in the committees. >> all things were joining us. -- thanks for joining us. [unintelligible] these pictures have come in the last hour or so. a public-relations company has been brought into news corp. is helping murdock prepare for this. it seems to have changed their approach. from rupert murdoch said there were only minor problems and told this to american news -- newspapers. but in britain, he apologized to the british public for the hacking scandal. the real question is what will be amended in a select committee today on questions on whether or not there was a cover-up. this has shaken many of the foundations of the british political scale. >> four decades, -- for decades, rupert murdoch has towered over britain's. but what will remain of him? has this shifted the balance between politicians and media in britain? >> the relationship became too close. we all want the support of newspaper groups and broadcasting
the markets. >> europe's leaders know they have to get over big political differences if the greek problem is to be solved. >> leaders have to raise above their domestic political agenda, and they will. proposals of the euro group on measures that will risk contagion in your area are you are intelligently needed. >> the fact they are still talking about proposals is surely alarming. this crisis is 18 months old now and investors may be losing patience. matthew price, "bbc news," brussels. >> feels like everyone is losing patience. the ireland situation, junk bond status according to moody. >> yes. the credit rating is now down junk status and by doing these cuts, moody's is doing -- showing that they need to agree and bring in a proper fix for this debt crisis, but it also raise this is discrepancy among the rating agencies. stacey dugard and fitch have ireland raised three notches above jupping status and moody's not only did they downgrade them to junk status but said there could be further doubts come. but the problem for poor ireland, they'll likely be forced to get rid of those bonds,
struggling. on top of the eurozone is a big market for u.s. multinational firms. so, it's no wonder that economist bruce kasman says it's really bad timing for a rate hike in europe. >> the euro area as a region delivers less in terms of growth as it could in helping the global economy, and then finally it adds risks and vulnerabilities to the really tough adjustments going on in greece and other peripheral countries right now. to be sure, a quarter of a percentage point increase in european rates tomorrow is likely to have only a nominal effect on u.s. growth. the concern is that the european central bank will proceed down a path of tighter monetary policy. >> the step that will be taken tomorrow by itself is not that big a deal, but the signal, if it gets realized in terms of further movements over the next six to 12 months, could have an impact in making it a little harder for the u.s. to get growth than it otherwise would. >> reporter: the good news is that buyers of u.s. stocks don't appear to be troubled by higher interest rates in other areas of the world. equity strategist a
of either of our two parties right now. and i think that is the big challenge right now. how do we basically develop a political platform and a mandate to do those four things. >> i would add a couple things. to what tom said which i basically agree with. but first there is a cultural element here. it's not just a problem in washington, it's a pblem in the culture. a nation where people have distrust of authority, don't trust government, unwilling to accept sacrice, feel very threatened, want pore government than they are willing to pay for, and so there has to be a gigantic education campaign to go under that. and then the second thing i would add, and tom talked about a hybrid politics, i uld say we'vead it. and we just have to rediscover it. and i go back perpeally to my hero alex aner hamilton who created this hrid politics it was not -- he got us out of the big government versus small government debat he stood for lited b energetic government to enhance social mobility. so people in the hamiltonian practise decision which include the wig party and the lincoln an republican party at the
and protecting itself. >> to which one answer might be "so why is it so big?" i mean, it is a vast territorial power which has, of course, significant ethnic minorities. they have large territories. >> rose: so you're suggesting that there is a history of chinese imperialism and any other historian who suggests that... >> no, no. i think that henry kissinger is clearly right. that it is not an eansionist power inhe sense thatfor exame, russia was. expanding constantly but i think... >> rose: and certain after the war. >> but i think that what you see already is a chinese strategic doctrine and kissinger, i think, would not dispute this which stakes an ambitious claim to a spheref influence as we rightly said and that would provoke conflict so i i think we're entering very very difficult times >> rose: well, your oxford colleague neil ferguson suggests that nationalistic forces will overwhelm and that there will be a conflict between... in some way between the united states and china. >> well any historian who has looked at the history of the rise and fall of great powers would say such shifts
was the big question. it was cleveland himself who recommended going on a boat. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: senate democrats vowed to stay in session around the clock to resolve the debt crisis. house republicans modified their plan
, with the big board trading over one billion shares, nasdaq volume 2.4 billion. the economy worsened in about half the country in recent weeks due to weak home sales and signs of a slowdown in manufacturing. a federal reserve survey out today shows seven of the fed's 12 bank regions reported slower growth. and in another sign of new weakness in the economy, the commerce department says there were fewer orders of aircraft, autos, heavy machinery and computers last month. orders for durable goods fell by 2%. >> reporter: i'm diane eastabrook in orion township, michigan. still ahead, i'll tell you how general motors plans to make money selling this small car with help from the u.a.w. >> susie: can you say $1,630 an ounce? that's the new record for gold prices set today, before the precious metals encountered selling. in new york trading, gold futures lost $2 to settle at $1,617 an ounce. but, as suzanne prt reports, gold prices could continue to shine on. >> reporter: at morningstar's jewelers and pawnbrokers in hollywood, florida, business is sparkling. but, it's business from customers looking
exposure to italian paper. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calme
for the auto industry. we examine the new round of labor talks between the u.a.w. and detroit's big three. >> ifill: ray suarez gets an update on the turmoil in libya. >> brown: and we close with a paul solman story about a convicted murderer and middle school dropout who now makes $80,000 a year after completing college while behind bars. >> these are my dreams. i fit in right here, but this is what i'm looking at, this is where i want to be, this is where i can be, this is where i deserve to be. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting scie
in damascus. >> it's the highest lottery prize ever offered in european history. >> perhaps with a big lottery win you buy a flash supercar or maybe perhaps a luxury home, possibly even a never-ending holiday of a lifetime. but better yet, what about buying the whole lot? because if you win the euro millions this week, there's no doubt you could afford it all. across europe, ticket sales are soaring, from spain to switzerland, ireland to france, people all over are trying their luck at winning the 185 million euro jackpot. this store in belgium, for instance, has seen an unprecedented surge of wannabe winners. >> i think it's one of the best weeks of the year. people came on more, and we're expecting the crazy day. >> the highest ever lottery win on european soil was in italy's super lotto two years ago. back then, one lucky ticket netted just under 148 million euros, but if tonight's jackpot is won by a single winner, that record will be smashed. but it won't just be good news for that person. the rules of euro millions don't allow the jackpot to grow beyond the 185 million euro, so any extra
, to the red, white, and blue. in the big apple and elsewhere, the day will end with the usual bursts of color, lighting the night sky-- a once-a-year moment, cherished by millions. but, in some places, this year, the sky will be silent. raging wildfires and dry weather in arizona, new mexico, and texas have forced authorities to cancel fourth of july fireworks in certain areas. >> a lot of people are going to be really disappointed, i thinkç >> woodruff: the patriotic spirit isn't felt only in the united states. these u.s. soldiers stationed in southeastern afghanistan held a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 4th. and at kandahar airfield general david petraeus spent his last independence day as commander of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, with the troops. petraeus set to take up his new job as c.i.a. director later this year, today administered the oath of re-enlistment to 235 service members.çç >> you can really feel the honor, especially when you get a general like general petreas come down and do it for us. it makes it really feel a lot more important to me. it'll be nice
. but it remains to be seen whether there will be a big enough reduction in great that for that to happen, and whether they have managed to build a fire wall around greece. >> do you think this deal is just another sticking plaster? >> i think it will be difficult for this deal completely to save greece. it is not clear, because we are not seeing all the details. the reduction in debt that private debt holders are expected to take is not that big. it is a reduction of 20% in the net present value. unless the official debt is good to come in with gigantic amounts of money -- greece is going to still have a giant debt burden. it is difficult because the greek growth rate is not high and the government has trouble collecting taxes. unless greece suddenly becomes much more productive and competitive, it is likely they will have to come back and do another debt reduction further down . >> is this bailout ultimately political by leaders who want to save the eurozone, red and economic? >> when it comes to saving the eurozone, the two are intertwined. you could be more cynical and say it is to do
a statement when he returns to try and allay their fears. of course, m.p.'s are gearing up tomorrow for a big piece of political theater when the murdoches and rebekah brooks appear before them at a committee hearing. >> ed miliband, just moments before david cameron announced parliament was going to sit on wednesday, he called for exactly the same thing, saying the prime minister shouldn't be out of the country, he should be facing questions from parliament. we're also getting into a lot of detail now, but it's emerged that the editor, john yates, assistant police commissioner at the met, very controversial figure, was in charge of checking out neil wallis, the person forwarded by the police commissioner. there are so many questions. the committee tomorrow is not going to be able to get through all of them, are they? >> no, they're not t. is getting rather complicated now. one of the the main thing to remember is that this scandal is about the three p's -- the press, the police, and the politicians. and as david cameron himself says, all three have big questions to answer. now, although the
people about the health care crisis? >> that's a big question, and i would say what i learned and again many interviews. is a lot of the disparity of who gets what. and the gap between rich and poor is bigger than ever. and if you have a lot of resources, fantastic things can happen to you, and if you don't, you probably won't get that chance. and what i learned about america, and it would be impossible to think of it as a person. but what i see recurring, that hope is something that is a part of the american personality. this belief that things will be better and that we can make it better. tavis: hope even about an issue as contentious as health care, and i ask that when the debate was so ugly, and now that we pass it and don't know how much congress will try to roll back what happened. let me ask you what the debate as we sit here today? >> i don't think that the debate is helpful, and they should be but this one isn't. and the democrats admit when it first got rolled out it wasn't explained well. and i think that the debate is causing more confusion, and now i will make my plug for
every problem. that created problems for him. >> this is for the big attacks, like suicide attacks. are two major suicide attacks on me -- on my office -- there were two major suicide attacks me -oe -- on my office. >> are they still happening? >> taliban pou >> he came under fire from his allies -- taliban. >> he came under fire from his allies, too. there are reports that you support the taliban. >> that is in the past. >> never he did, -- whatever he did, ahmad wali was the point man for the allied forces. >> for more on the power vacuum the assassination leaves, i am joined by david ignatius. thank you for joining us. with ahmad wali karzai gone, who will fill his shoes? >> we do not know yet. the key strong man in this area of kandahar has been ahmad wali karzai. he said that wali karzai, who has been such a problem for the u.s. and coalition -- a corrupt or lower, -- corrup warlord -t d -- with him gone, they will look for somebody else, but it is not likely they can fill the role quickly. >> why did he say they worked too closely -- he worked to closely with the taliban? >>
that could also come out a big winner. the family of the british singer has thank herwinehouse fans -- has thanked her fans. >> flowers and a tribute. many around here had met her out and about in camden. >> so sad. >> a multimillion-dollar selling artist, it winner of five grammy awards, she had had lunch with her mother, janice, on thursday. have, janice and amy's dad come to the shrine. >> it is making it a lot easier for us. i knew this was about one thing, and that was love. >> among the group, her manager, her boyfriend, those that had lived with the ups and downs, the successes and addictions, but this was unexpected. this was a -- there had been no signs of crisis. she had been seen by a doctor on friday night. the last person to speak to her was a security guard on saturday morning. saturday afternoon, they were unable to wake her. today's post mortem was inconclusive. more tests were needed. but hers -- her friend russell brand said he had long feared the worst as his wife, kate. , explained. >> when you know someone who is dealing with addiction, you dread that phone call. >> it
brings another startling turn in this story. todas big turn was the dpe sigs by rupert and james murdoch james being his son and head of his british operations, to do 180-degree turn raer late in the day and having told the parliamentary committee that's going to hold a hearing on tuesday that they would not attend james murdoch saying ther loosely "i can't make it that day, i'll make it some other day. they then... summons were issued by the parliamentary committee which had fairly serious implications and they changed their minds. so we now know that come tuesday we will have the three principal executives that are in the frame on all of which, which is rurplt himself, his son, and rebek brooks who is the chief executive as you know of the murdoch subsidiary here in london being called to testify before parliament. catherine, where do you think the next term is in this story? >> well, john said it'saken a different turner. it's taking so many differen turns everyday that that's a really difficult questio i think that it is likely for the moment to stay focused on news international bec
on the show time series the big c. here's a look at that series. >> the doctor. oh, pardon me, sir. dr. sherman, hi. my name's kathy. >> i'm the nurse. >> you're not a drug rap, are you? >> no, no, i'm not. i'm a dying woman who is trying to see the right doctor and ask him if he s any advice on how to save my life. the best i can do is spend the last two hours a day on hold from your office to find out if anyone's canceled. that's not okay. >> i'm going to asyou to leave. >> i will not leave. >> charlie: the big c is currently airing on show time mondays at 10:30 p.m. i'm pleased to have laura lean -- laura linney back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: when you look at that, what do you think? >> it's a weird, you know sort of tapestry of what you feel and i always feel slightly embarrassed when i look at myself. >> charlie: really? you don't look at this clinically and say i can't wait to have somebody watch it. >> i also good off camera. i give performances off camera to people who would never -- i mean, on camera i try my best. but there's, the further i get awa
for further problems in spain and italy, and these problems would be so big that they could not be solved with a current instrument that we have. >> there is no simple formula, but patience is in short supply. and if the european union can't be made to work in its current form, then the alternatives are pretty stark. further integration, perhaps fiscal and, therefore, closer to a political union, all breaking the eurozone apart. finding a solution is one of the biggest challenges the e.u. has ever faced. chris morris, bbc news, brussels. >> the time is fast approaching when that summit will start and sum arrival is already taking place. james robbins is in brussels, and he joins me now. james, we've got certainly french and german banks with the most to lose with regard to greece, i suppose, and it's france and germany, the old motor of the european union, which, is it fair to say, is now driving what's going to be the answer to this problem? >> yes, whether it's the answer, that's the very big question. you're right, france and germany are trying to drive the process of presenting at the
big it's sapping the drive out of people and keeping the government fromming from full capacity. the solution is not complicated. if you're spending more than your taking in you need to spe less of. there's no symptom more menacing than our debt and we begin to liberate our economy and our future. charlie: we'll are have much more on the story tomorrow from new york and washington. also this evening phil mickelson. the great golfer stops to talk about higame and passions. >> i play my best when i'm challenged. the more challenging the shot the better i pull it off so i have to challenge myself. i can't hit a seven-iron lay-up shot if i can reach it way hybrid or three-wood i have to challenge myse. >> charlie: we conclud the evening with steve carell and the new film "crazy, stupid love." >> when people try to be funny it doesn't necessarily work that way you play it honestly and it evolves by that and by the same token if an actor is known for comedic work goes to do a drama you don't have to walk around with a frown on your face because you're on a drama. people don't know in
decimates the economy, then obama would be a big loser. >> rose: also this evening a conversation with paul krugman and david brooks th columnists at the "new york times". this conversation took pla before the president's press conference and therefore was edited accordingly. >> whave no consensus in our political system. there is no center. we have no consensus about what all to be happening. so if you try to strike a lo-term deal you're basically stking a deal that nobody actually beeves and that isot going to be adhered to. i think we buy we buy se time. shouldn't be negotiating at all about the debt ceiling but we buy someime and give the voters another chance to weigh in. >> we really need to cut i think some of the rating agencies have said this, we need to cut $4 trillion to sort of stabilize debt levels and if we don't do that that's really bad news. and then the second thing i do think both parties may find it useful to have a framework. no, we're to the going to write a plan that is going to dictate the next ten years of politics but both parties may find it extremely useful to ha
. senior citizens will take some hits. there will be -- education will take big hits with the pell grants. to achieve the so-called cuts they are talking about would mean that a lot of people could be severely hurt. >> but we cannot sustain this level of debt forever. >> we cannot, but here is what is wrong -- we have to get control of the deficit, but we do not want to do anything on the revenue side. all of the pain is coming from the cuts. you are still leaving those tax cuts to the wealthy untouched, still living subsidies in for the oil companies untouched. everything to the poor folks and middle-class folks, they bear the brunt of it. >> met monday this week -- "my view is we should have a president who agrees to cut, cap, and balance the budget" -- mitt romney. >> he does not want to get too far out on a limb in the spirit in the grand bargain, there were revenue increases, closing loopholes that nobody wants to defend, except for grover norquist, who is having an incredible amount of power in this debate. there's a counter intuitive thing here. you have to spend some to get out of
to be rescued. >> i was sleeping and heard a big sound. >> i suddenly heard a strange sound, like a large trade explosion sound, so i walked outside. -- like a large trade explosion. -- train explosion. >> they are calling it the worst rain in a century. hundreds of thousands -- hundreds of houses flooded. rhodes often impossible to accept with the health of rescue teams -- roads often impossible to pass except with the help of rescue teams. lucy williamson, bbc news, seoul, korea. >> tomorrow in london, more than 1000 british veterans who were exposed to nuclear testing in the 1950's and lost their case for damages will be hoping the supreme court will give them permission to appeal. the elderly veterans believe there ill health is due to exposure during the tests, but the ministry of defence has contested that claims since 2004. our correspondent reports. >> not until 10 seconds and could anybody in look. so intense was the man made sun that people miles away with their back turns and hands over their eyes are aware of its fantastic brilliance. >> basically, we had no protection, no warning.
. this is big for facebook. i do not know it is revolutionary for the user. >> all the people using facebook -- i understand a lot of people are deciding they do not want to use facebook. do they want to have a chat and video conferences? i thought that was more of their work scenario. >> with this audience, with any audience, this kind of video chat behavior is for the minority of your interactions. if you are in a certain place, once you introduce visual and audio cues, you have to have a controlled environment. i cannot do a video chat with you while i am on the bus going to work. that is complicated. i can always do a text chat. this is a rich interface for a minority of your communications. but facebook once those to happen within facebook, and not have you leave to use your skype program. >> i think i understand the technical side of this. one thing that seems to be clear from the business side is it comes in the same week that google announced its social network. it is trying to take on facebook as well. who is winning that battle? >> it depends how you measure it. on sheer numbers, n
.k. version of some big names. it's important to note the u.k. newspaper part of the empire only represents 4% of group sales. but if you look, for example, at the cost of news of the world, the profits they contribute and the weekday paper, the sun, it's about $138 million. for a global empire that makes hand in earnings about $3 billion a year, they can probably handle a loss in advertising revenue and readers. but they've also got the possible conference ensation coming up from the alleged victims of the phone hacking. sienna miller's phone was hacked and received a settlement of $160,000 u.s. dollars. if you multiply that times alleged victims, $32 million is what it comes closer to. we'll have a look at the european central bank. likely to go up with interest rates today. more on that coming up. >> state media in china dismiss reports a head has tied. culminating reports that said he was dead. from beijing is our correspondent. martin, what has been fueling all this speculation? >> well, these rumors started last week because he failed to show up to the celebration marking china's commun
of favoring big corporate status quo and wall street even though in his heart of hearts, that is not what he believes. tavis: that may be a enough of an albatross to make sure that he does not get reelected. the first two well, he did not control. was all about law enforcement. the second was about congress, not necessarily the white house. it is the third one that could mess him up. he gets on the campaign trail, he can s u responsibility for the first two, can he not? >> the law enforcement part of that has been under his watch. it has and a lax effort. they have not been aggressive. but that's what the obama mentality of let's turn the page on tour -- if fits with the obama mentality of let's turn the page on torture. the dodd-frank, that is a shared responsibility. i wish the obama administration has taken more of a leading role when they were fighting on health care and pushing that forward. health care was taken by his opponents and used to demonize them and helped give him the congress that he now has. tavis: i am curious as to your take on this. how have the obama people so badly mis
's that possible, surely that is far fetched. the big guns of the socialist party have been out today in force. we have had the former prime minister saying that he can win the presidency if they can get him out of court but we don't know how and when they will free him. this is an extraordinary terms of development. the candidates will put their name forward. i think that most critics who were watching thought it was a pretty uninspiring list. they did not have the killer instinct that dominique strauss- kahn has, the persona, the international standing. the socialist party knows that if he can be rehabilitated in the eyes of the french public, he can win a gamble. >> they were furious about the way he was traded. >> not just with the american justice system but with the way the american media treated it. there was some headlines like in the "new york post." these did not go down very well. 56% thought this was a conspiracy and this was a plot to bring down leading socialist candidate. there were many people who will be pleased and that has been echoed by the socialist party. there's also a good
' point is white. these are tiny, tiny little drops in a big ocean. there is not enough in corporate jets or even the hedge fund guys, although i would like to. they have to raise revenues, i hate to say it, on the middle class. this is the point that gets lost on this. everybody is in this boat. there is no way out of it unless every single american does something. >> raise revenues on the shrinking middle class, mark. >> everybody is in it, and evan is right -- evan addressed the possibility of default. when that happens, the federal government of the united states, which bars or 40 cents of every dollar we spend every single day, is faced with the option -- do you pay a sergeant in combat in kandahar, a grandmother with a 1-bedroom apartment in social security check, or to meet the obligations of bankers who are holding their debt in beijing and beverly hills? the answer is simple. the prior claim is on the second group. the reality is we are talking about -- the president is proposing increasing taxes, revenues, by 1% over the next 10 years. $400 billion. we are going to collect $39 t
we have seen from the taliban is a change in tactics. those big attacks that would result and many civilian casualties, they are not the main forced of attack. what we are seeing is assassination of political leaders. ahmad wali karzai one of the biggest casualties. >> the former british prime minister gordon brown said that alleged links between rupert murdoch's news company and the criminal underworld need to be investigated. mr. brown whose son was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, spoke about his shock that they were targeted. she spoke exclusively to glen campbell about allegations she was targeted. >> i have never talked publicly about fraser's condition. obviously, we wanted that to be kept private for all of the obvious reasons. you want to do the best buy your children. and i've never complained about what happened to me before. the truth is that information did come out. i was approached by some newspaper. they told me they had this story about fraser's medical condition and they were going to run this story. >> how did that affect you as a father? >> in tears. your son is
. the journey ended in bakersfield. today, the big employers here are oil and farming, but the biggest employer of all by far, is the u.s. government, in the form of the military. when america boom, bakersfield. . -- when america boomed, b baker'so feel toomed. all across the south, there are the same basic problems, not enough credit to solve the housing market. >> general david petraeus is regarded as one of america's best and brightest. he's about to begin a new job as head of the cia. our diplomatic editor has been talking to general petraeus on his way home from afghanistan about america's longest war and other matters. >> nato forces in afghanistan have a new commander. general david petraeus is on the way home. he had been expected to serve longer but has been recalled to head the cia. the force he is leaving behind is now being quicker than he recommended. the insurgency has shown itself capable of hitting back with the assassinations and spectacular attacks. nato insists that they're winning. i asked the general what the possible grounds for optimism could be. >> what we have seen now
sniping on a mission that we joined. there is still a big problem with corruption. the question now, will the afghans be able to do the job the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> for more on these challenges and calls for an even quicker drawdown of u.s. troops, i spoke earlier with a former adviser to the u.s. military in afghanistan. so, seth, have david cameron asking the taliban to stop fighting, put down their weapons, join the political process. what do you think the chances are that might happen? >> there are elements of the taliban and other insurgent groups that are willing to talk about this option. they have been fighting for three decades in afghanistan. people are tired. i think right now what we're seeing is some elements willing, some elements unwilling. based on the fact that many of them believe they are winning right now, that the u.s. and other allies are leaving, i think it is unlikely that they will cut a deal now. not wait it out -- why not wait it out? >> to what extent is the taliban looking at things like this letter-signing, seeing
in the future. >> susie: let's talk a little. we were talking to a big institutional shareholder who is very concern body the outlook for this stock. would you buy news corp at $16. is this an opportunity for investors, or is it too risky? >> near term with the $5 billion share buy back that mr. murdoch announced tuesday that begins on august 5th, i think near term, it's probably a buy at news corp, but long term, you have to wait until the dust settles. there's too much uncertainty, and potential liability that the company and senior managers are facing. that want to invest long term. >> susie: there was an article in "newsweek" written by carl bernstein under the title, murdoch's watergate and saying that this is the beginning of the end of the murdoch empire. your thoughts on that. could that be the case? >> i don't think the empire is going to crumble any time soon. but what i think we are seing is perhaps an end to the celebrity type cuture ta inculcated journalism on both sides of the atlantic and has been mainly stimulateed and driven by the murdoch approach to get the news at any cos
to take on our deficit is with a balanced approach. one where the wealthiest americans and big corporations pay their fair share too. >> reporter: meanwhile the leader of the democratic majority in the senate, harry reid, has been working on a competing proposal. it would raise the debt ceiling and cut $2.7 trillion in spending. the savings would come from federal agencies and defense spending but avoid controversial changes to entitlement programs and the u.s. tax code. >> so now all the republicans have to do is say yes. unfortunately, the republicans who used to run the congress on the caucuses are being driven by the radical, right wing that is so in tune with the tea party. they want their leaders to ignore the american people as they're doing. they want their leaders to ignore the business leaders like the chamber of commerce that they're ignoring. and even a majority of republicans around this country want something to happen and they're refusing to do that. >> reporter: this afternoon reid's plan got official endorsement from the white house spokesman describing it as a
islamic communy. >> yes, very big debate. >> rose: and tt debate is? >> tha debate is, ones that whether you can go create an islamic state through the current political democratic way, or that democracy is the enemy of islam, it's not an islamic way so you have to topple it through, you know, an undemocratic way. i think there is a dete on that. and then the second underlying debate is if we are in power, should we still be democracy. so more directly into what they callslamic wing. >> rose: and what wod be the role model for that? >> well, this is the problem. because they don't have what we call the practical example in reality. t they wou have like the way when prophet mohammed rule or -- 1400 years ago. >> re: do most people in indonesia consid iran a success? >> only minorities. turkey is much more a mod. >> rose: and turkey is what indonesia would le to be? >> some indonesia is, the justice party look at turkey as a model. but some of the people saying that turkey is not a finished model. it's going to the right model. >> rose: there are people who think this includes the prime mi
of politics involved here in terms of as you said, they made it a big case from the start and said they had the case. >> yeah, they said they had the case. and we did hear from cyrus mance today. also ken thompson the lawyer for the accuser, for the made, he criticized the manhattan district attorney, said that they perhaps were fearing they mr. going to lose the case. they were setting up for a dismissal. they were very critical. he even referenced manhattan district attorney's recent cases that had failed. so this is a very interesting dynamic. and this could be a major blow for cyrus mance, the manhattan district attorney. today we did not see that strong, confident prosecution we saw in the last two courtrooms. >> brown: laurie levenson, pick up on that last part. the split that we saw when the attorney for the accuser came out was very strongly going after the prosecutor for dropping the ball, for not picking up, and really telling him, do not let go of this. how unusual is something like that? >> well, you know, this is a big advocate for the victim. and a lot of victims don't have su
to create the next big thing? but make sure that production is here. >> brown: it was the third such social media event for the president this year. in april, he took part in a town hall hosted by facebook, and in january, he answered video questions submitted via youtube. for the president and other politicians and leaders, twitter especially has become an increasingly essential communications tool. republican mitt romney used the service in early june to announce to his followers he was running for president. and then, to keep them in the loop about campaign events. and with more than half a million followers, former vice presidential candidate sarah palin is a frequent user, sometimes posting multiple times a day. but there are also cautionary tales including, most recently, congressman anthony weiner, whose tweeted sexual messages and photos opened him to ridicule and ended in his resignation. >> now, our next question comes from someone you may know-- this is speaker boehner. >> oh, there you go. ( laughter ) >> brown: as for today's town hall, some of the president's political opponen
of confidence. they're concerned with the really big question that dominated all of american politics. how do you regrouped project america when the government is running out of money and the people are no longer prepared to pay more in taxes? this man looks like your typical computer science professor. he could really do with a new bicycle. he can certainly afford it. in a light 90's, he had two students, an enterprising duo that promised him a share in their new business if he gave him their advice. how much are you actually were? >> i don't like to answer that question. -- how much are you actually worth? >> more than a billion? >> that would not be completely inaccurate, let me put it that way. >> and billionaire professor who carries his own chipped tea mug. he is probably the richest academic in the world. he worries that in obama's america, wealth has become a dirty word. >> we should be empowering these people. we should be encouraging the next generation but i think there is almost a hostile attitude towards the people that have been successful in this country and the people that are
such a big hit already, it probably won't make that much difference to the public standing, the public in which they find themselves. >> so what do you think really was the overriding factor here? is it a moral decision, media decision, or business decision? >> well, it's obviously a business decision, clearly. but i think other things come into it, and we don't know, we can't be party to the discussions and internal investigations that have gone on. she was editor of "news of the world" during the period in which some of the worst examples of hacking, the hacking into milly dowler, the 7/7 bomb victims' phones, and in view of that, that revelation itself should have led to her resignation. it's possible she's resigned a couple of times, it's been rejected, and finally, perhaps on the third occasion, murdoch and his advisors decided, ok, fair enough, it's time she went. >> it's strange, though, isn't it? just a few days ago, speaking to "news of the world" journalists, she said they would understand why the newspaper had to close, because she was privy to information that was going to
't you going against the policy that's in place where you're at?" >> smith: manning was taking a big risk. under the army's "don't ask, don't tell" rules, gay soldiers, like manning, were required to keep their sexual orientation secret. his friends also worried about his political activism. >> in his facebook profile, he posted signs and pictures at his presence at rallies. >> smith: gay rights rallies? >> right. this struck me as very dangerous to his position. i mean, i admired him for his... you know, for his courage on this, but i thought it might be a little bit foolhardy. >> smith: during this period, manning also started a relationship with a young man from upstate new york named tyler watkins. on weekends, bradley would visit him in boston, where watkins was studying. during those trips, the young intelligence analyst also found a new group of friends, computer science students and hackers. at the time, wikileaks was already making headlines, and julian assange was an admired figure among hackers. boston opened new doors for manning, but he had a problem back on base. >> he thoug
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